The Central District’s African-American community is moving away, and people like Patrinell Wright, who moved to the neighborhood in 1964, are feeling a sense of loss. Story by Pacific Northwest Magazine writer Tyrone Beason.

Pastor Patrinell Wright, portrayed in her Central District home, remembers when the neighborhood was mostly black and middle class. Today, less than one-fifth of the population is black.  "I miss my friends," she says.

Pastor Patrinell Wright, portrayed in her Central District home, remembers when the neighborhood was mostly black and middle class. Today, less than one-fifth of the population is black. “I miss my friends,” she says.

Benny Wright climbs the stairs of his Central District home in Seattle. The retired schoolteacher and his wife, Pastor Patrinell Wright, have lived for nearly 50 years in the home with their family.

Benny Wright climbs the stairs of his Central District home in Seattle. The retired schoolteacher and his wife, Pastor Patrinell Wright, have lived for nearly 50 years in the home with their family.

John Fabre, 70, in red, tends to his lawn with the help of Will McCaskey, 54, in the Central District, where construction crews are installing a large new housing development. Fabre says he started to see the neighborhood change about 20 years ago. "Neighbors arenÕt neighborly anymore," he says of newer residents who avoid eye contact and donÕt say hello. He worries increases in property taxes will drive out residents on fixed incomes.

John Fabre, 70, in red, tends to his lawn with the help of Will McCaskey, 54, in the Central District, where construction crews are installing a large new housing development. Fabre says he started to see the neighborhood change about 20 years ago. “Neighbors arenÕt neighborly anymore,” he says of newer residents who avoid eye contact and donÕt say hello. He worries increases in property taxes will drive out residents on fixed incomes.

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Throughout the Central District fliers to purchase homes for "fast cash" and to Òbuy land and tear down propertiesÓ are widely posted. Seattle hip-hop star Macklemore recently released the song "White Privilege II," which explores issues of race, equity, white privilege and police brutality.

Throughout the Central District fliers to purchase homes for “fast cash” and to Òbuy land and tear down propertiesÓ are widely posted. Seattle hip-hop star Macklemore recently released the song “White Privilege II,” which explores issues of race, equity, white privilege and police brutality.

Charles Guidry, black sneakers, and his twin brother Andrew Guidry, white sneakers, 29, grew up in the Central District and currently with their family in the neighborhood. They say itÕs safer, but more expensive than 20-30 years ago. Their goal is to become entertainers in the movie industry.

Charles Guidry, black sneakers, and his twin brother Andrew Guidry, white sneakers, 29, grew up in the Central District and currently with their family in the neighborhood. They say itÕs safer, but more expensive than 20-30 years ago. Their goal is to become entertainers in the movie industry.

A man, who goes by the name Renaissance, chants outside of Uncle IkeÕs pot shop at the corner of 23rd Avenue East and East Union Street on April 20, 2016 in the Central District. Protest organizers spoke out against the pot shopÕs close proximity to the Joshua Generation Teen Center and Mount Calvary Christian Center church.  Demonstrators also spoke out about the Central DistrictÕs increasing gentrification and the number of African Americans in jail for selling marijuana.

A man, who goes by the name Renaissance, chants outside of Uncle IkeÕs pot shop at the corner of 23rd Avenue East and East Union Street on April 20, 2016 in the Central District. Protest organizers spoke out against the pot shopÕs close proximity to the Joshua Generation Teen Center and Mount Calvary Christian Center church. Demonstrators also spoke out about the Central DistrictÕs increasing gentrification and the number of African Americans in jail for selling marijuana.

Large modern townhouses rise between houses in the Central District near Garfield High School.

Large modern townhouses rise between houses in the Central District near Garfield High School.

Icy Jones, 21, holds his baby Jaiden, 1, with Leilani Jackson, 22, at their tiny house in Othello Village in Rainier Valley. The couple is working and saving money to get their own place. Jackson said they are planning to eventually relocate to Auburn due to affordability, but worries about finding a home close to transit lines so she can make it back to work in Seattle.

Icy Jones, 21, holds his baby Jaiden, 1, with Leilani Jackson, 22, at their tiny house in Othello Village in Rainier Valley. The couple is working and saving money to get their own place. Jackson said they are planning to eventually relocate to Auburn due to affordability, but worries about finding a home close to transit lines so she can make it back to work in Seattle.

Icy Jones, 21, his baby Jaiden, 1, and mother Leilani Jackson, 22, talk inside their tiny house in Othello Village in Rainier Valley. The couple says itÕs hard to start out as a young couple and make a living wage. They wish there were more resources and positive opportunities for youth and young adults in Seattle.

Icy Jones, 21, his baby Jaiden, 1, and mother Leilani Jackson, 22, talk inside their tiny house in Othello Village in Rainier Valley. The couple says itÕs hard to start out as a young couple and make a living wage. They wish there were more resources and positive opportunities for youth and young adults in Seattle.

A photograph of late pastor and founder Alice M. Adams hangs at Full Gospel Deliverance Center in Skyway. Her daughter Pastor Janis Adams leads the small and vibrant church in Skyway that feeds homeless on Thanksgiving, offers school supplies for children, picnics for families and provides support for domestic violence.

A photograph of late pastor and founder Alice M. Adams hangs at Full Gospel Deliverance Center in Skyway. Her daughter Pastor Janis Adams leads the small and vibrant church in Skyway that feeds homeless on Thanksgiving, offers school supplies for children, picnics for families and provides support for domestic violence.

Brian Harris helps Mother Helen Jacobs from services at Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church along a commercial strip lined with churches in Skyway. Jacobs has been a mother of the church since the 1940s. The Church, headed by Pastor Lawrence "Ricky" Willis, moved from the Central District to Skyway.

Brian Harris helps Mother Helen Jacobs from services at Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church along a commercial strip lined with churches in Skyway. Jacobs has been a mother of the church since the 1940s. The Church, headed by Pastor Lawrence “Ricky” Willis, moved from the Central District to Skyway.

Usher Jacqueline Armstrong prays at Curry Temple CME Church in the Central District, where vandals spray-painted racist graffiti and swastikas inside the building during late April 2016. Rev. Beverly R. Jackson said the incident left some of the church elders feeling unsafe.

Usher Jacqueline Armstrong prays at Curry Temple CME Church in the Central District, where vandals spray-painted racist graffiti and swastikas inside the building during late April 2016. Rev. Beverly R. Jackson said the incident left some of the church elders feeling unsafe.

Alice Gibson preys with Mother Willis and Mother Jacobs at  Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. The Church, headed by pastor Pastor Lawrence R. Willis, moved from the Central District to Skyway.

Alice Gibson preys with Mother Willis and Mother Jacobs at Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. The Church, headed by pastor Pastor Lawrence R. Willis, moved from the Central District to Skyway.

Congregation members support Sharon OÕCain during services at Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. O'Cain was scheduled for an upcoming surgery.

Congregation members support Sharon OÕCain during services at Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. O’Cain was scheduled for an upcoming surgery.

Pastor Lawrence "Ricky" Willis heads the Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. Willis moved his church from the Central District.

Pastor Lawrence “Ricky” Willis heads the Truevine of Holiness Missionary Baptist Church in Skyway. Willis moved his church from the Central District.

MyKhai Phillips, 5; his mother, LaShaye Stanton-Phillips; and sister, MyJestie-MyLahaiya Phillips, 3, listen during First African Methodist Episcopal ChurchÕs Resurrection Services on Easter. The first and oldest African-American church in Seattle started in 1886 and has been in its current Capitol Hill location since 1890. The Church started its South Campus in Auburn in 2003.

MyKhai Phillips, 5; his mother, LaShaye Stanton-Phillips; and sister, MyJestie-MyLahaiya Phillips, 3, listen during First African Methodist Episcopal ChurchÕs Resurrection Services on Easter. The first and oldest African-American church in Seattle started in 1886 and has been in its current Capitol Hill location since 1890. The Church started its South Campus in Auburn in 2003.

Diners eat at Fat's Chicken and Waffles on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and East Cherry Street. Catfish Corner was formally housed in this Central District business.

Diners eat at Fat’s Chicken and Waffles on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and East Cherry Street. Catfish Corner was formally housed in this Central District business.

General Manager Erika White brings out plates at Fat's Chicken and Waffles on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and East Cherry Street in the Central District. White hopes to one day take over the restaurant.

General Manager Erika White brings out plates at Fat’s Chicken and Waffles on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and East Cherry Street in the Central District. White hopes to one day take over the restaurant.

Dancer and choreographer Dani Tirrell watches performances at the Seattle Art Museum's Legendary Children event April 29, 2016. The night celebrated Seattle's QTPOC communities and "Kehinde Wiley's: A New Republic" exhibition.

Dancer and choreographer Dani Tirrell watches performances at the Seattle Art Museum’s Legendary Children event April 29, 2016. The night celebrated Seattle’s QTPOC communities and “Kehinde Wiley’s: A New Republic” exhibition.

DoNormaal, or Christy Karefa-Johnson, performs at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle, inside a Central District basement. Renee Jarrelau Greene started the parties after hearing complaints that there were no places for LGBTQ people of color to party. Darqness networks with queer and trans artists across the country and brings them to Seattle for performances.

DoNormaal, or Christy Karefa-Johnson, performs at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle, inside a Central District basement. Renee Jarrelau Greene started the parties after hearing complaints that there were no places for LGBTQ people of color to party. Darqness networks with queer and trans artists across the country and brings them to Seattle for performances.

Blendiana Jones spins records at the Rhythm Rug at the Blu Grouse bar and restaurant in Georgetown. The dance night, held twice a month, draws crowds to dance to hip-hop, dancehall, afrobeat, funk and soul. "Being able to get out and dance and is an important part of different cultures,” said Jones. "Any spot like that in a new area is a positive thing."

Blendiana Jones spins records at the Rhythm Rug at the Blu Grouse bar and restaurant in Georgetown. The dance night, held twice a month, draws crowds to dance to hip-hop, dancehall, afrobeat, funk and soul. “Being able to get out and dance and is an important part of different cultures,” said Jones. “Any spot like that in a new area is a positive thing.”

Syd and Milk, center, dance at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle, inside a Central District basement. "I love queer and of color spaces because social meanings have a more intentional atmosphere of acceptance, which I don't consistently get in my daily (life), whether it's at work or on the street," says Milk.

Syd and Milk, center, dance at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle, inside a Central District basement. “I love queer and of color spaces because social meanings have a more intentional atmosphere of acceptance, which I don’t consistently get in my daily (life), whether it’s at work or on the street,” says Milk.

Kara Phoebe, a costume designer, stylist and writer, dances at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle. One of the reasons Phoebe moved from LA to Seattle was the nightlife supporting and connecting queer and trans people of color. "It was really important and powerful," she said. "It's often the first place you get to feel accepted in the world."

Kara Phoebe, a costume designer, stylist and writer, dances at Darqness, a party for queer and trans people of color in Seattle. One of the reasons Phoebe moved from LA to Seattle was the nightlife supporting and connecting queer and trans people of color. “It was really important and powerful,” she said. “It’s often the first place you get to feel accepted in the world.”

Tish Gallow listens to DJ Blendiana Jones spin records during Rhythm Rug at the Blu Grouse bar and restaurant in Georgetown. "Blendiana Jones is internally known DJ," said Gallow. "There are all kinds of people there, different nationalities,  ethnicities...His music is positive, it's fun."

Tish Gallow listens to DJ Blendiana Jones spin records during Rhythm Rug at the Blu Grouse bar and restaurant in Georgetown. “Blendiana Jones is internally known DJ,” said Gallow. “There are all kinds of people there, different nationalities, ethnicities…His music is positive, it’s fun.”

Michael Hodges, in red; Cipher Goings, in white; and Bryan McAfee, in blue, practice a hip-hop dance routine at Northwest Tap Connection in Rainier Beach. The race and social justice-oriented studio employs about a dozen African-American instructors, and exposes kids from Everett to Maple Valley to Tacoma to African-American culture, community and role models.

Michael Hodges, in red; Cipher Goings, in white; and Bryan McAfee, in blue, practice a hip-hop dance routine at Northwest Tap Connection in Rainier Beach. The race and social justice-oriented studio employs about a dozen African-American instructors, and exposes kids from Everett to Maple Valley to Tacoma to African-American culture, community and role models.

Taijari Mason watches dancers during a break at Northwest Tap Connection in Rainier Valley. The race and social justice-oriented studio employs around a dozen African American instructors, and draws in families from Everett to Maple Valley to Tacoma.

Taijari Mason watches dancers during a break at Northwest Tap Connection in Rainier Valley. The race and social justice-oriented studio employs around a dozen African American instructors, and draws in families from Everett to Maple Valley to Tacoma.

Iman Khawane, 21, takes a selfie at the recent Kehinde Wiley exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum. Khawane visited the exhibit with her friend Mahilet Tito, who said they were drawn to the way Wiley captures everyday black culture, fashion and hairstyles.

Iman Khawane, 21, takes a selfie at the recent Kehinde Wiley exhibit at the Seattle Art Museum. Khawane visited the exhibit with her friend Mahilet Tito, who said they were drawn to the way Wiley captures everyday black culture, fashion and hairstyles.

De'Ronn Frazier and his son, De'Vion Frazier, 5, share a moment at Frank's Barbershop.

De’Ronn Frazier and his son, De’Vion Frazier, 5, share a moment at Frank’s Barbershop.

Jessica O'Brien, 36, walks her pug in the Central District. OÕBrien grew up in the neighborhood with friends of different races, ethnicities and nationalities. When she moved back, she felt like one of the only black residents and that neighbors werenÕt friendly. She noticed people wouldnÕt make eye contact and cross the street to stay away. "It's funny. You've moved into my neighborhood but are ignoring or avoiding me," she said. "I went to the school down the street."

Jessica O’Brien, 36, walks her pug in the Central District. OÕBrien grew up in the neighborhood with friends of different races, ethnicities and nationalities. When she moved back, she felt like one of the only black residents and that neighbors werenÕt friendly. She noticed people wouldnÕt make eye contact and cross the street to stay away. “It’s funny. You’ve moved into my neighborhood but are ignoring or avoiding me,” she said. “I went to the school down the street.”


Northwest Tap Connection is a race and social justice-oriented studio. Hip hop dance instructor Shakiah Danielson and her student Talaya Logan discover themselves – and each other – through dance. (Erika Schultz and Corinne Chin / The Seattle Times)


HIV-positive Andile Madondile dreams of the day a vaccine will protect his kids from the virus. He recruits volunteers for HIV-prevention trials in Khayelitsha, a township outside Cape Town. (Erika Schultz & Corinne Chin / The Seattle Times)


The people battling HIV include the scientists and doctors working in state-of-the-art labs in Seattle and Cape Town, and the volunteers in South African townships enrolling in clinical trials. (Erika Schultz & Corinne Chin / The Seattle Times)


Partnering with local filmmaker Wes Hurley’s “Capitol Hill” web series, Seattle’s HIV Vaccine Trials Unit hosted an event to educate the LGBTQ community about a new prevention study. (Erika Schultz & Lauren Frohne / The Seattle Times)

In late May, Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro and I traveled to South Africa to work on a series of stories about how Seattle scientists are working with residents of the country’s townships. Their goal: an HIV vaccine.

Andile Madondile gives a science-heavy talk on HIV in a shack in Khayelitsha, a township outside Cape Town. An HIV activist, Madondile is trying to educate his neighbors and encourage sometimes-fearful South Africans to sign up for a clinical trial led, in part, by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Andile Madondile gives a science-heavy talk on HIV in a shack in Khayelitsha, a township outside Cape Town. An HIV activist, Madondile is trying to educate his neighbors and encourage sometimes-fearful South Africans to sign up for a clinical trial led, in part, by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

In Khayelitsha, a township outside Cape Town where some areas got electricity last year, this neighborhood lacks indoor plumbing. Andile Madondile lives a few doors from this home and must walk five minutes to use a toilet.

In Khayelitsha, a township outside Cape Town where some areas got electricity last year, this neighborhood lacks indoor plumbing. Andile Madondile lives a few doors from this home and must walk five minutes to use a toilet.

Camps Bay, one of Cape Town’s affluent suburbs, offers white sand beaches and trendy restaurants and bars.

Camps Bay, one of Cape Town’s affluent suburbs, offers white sand beaches and trendy restaurants and bars.

A Johannesburg billboard features President Jacob Zuma. His time in office has been marked by economic instability and allegations of corruption, but his government is a leader when it comes to HIV.

A Johannesburg billboard features President Jacob Zuma. His time in office has been marked by economic instability and allegations of corruption, but his government is a leader when it comes to HIV.

A woman receives an antibody infusion at the Vaccines Research Centre at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit in Soweto. She is part of a clinical trial enrolling 1,500 HIV-negative women across Africa.

A woman receives an antibody infusion at the Vaccines Research Centre at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit in Soweto. She is part of a clinical trial enrolling 1,500 HIV-negative women across Africa.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, center, works with a team to invite residents of the Freedom Park neighborhood of Soweto to HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. The team gives out syringe-shaped pens, seen above, pamphlets and fruit-flavored condoms.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, center, works with a team to invite residents of the Freedom Park neighborhood of Soweto to HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. The team gives out syringe-shaped pens, seen above, pamphlets and fruit-flavored condoms.

HIV activists and educators often distribute flavored condoms during outreach events.

HIV activists and educators often distribute flavored condoms during outreach events.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, center, talks with Makguata Kumalo at her home in Freedom Park. Nkase and her colleagues walked the neighborhood to invite residents to HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, center, talks with Makguata Kumalo at her home in Freedom Park. Nkase and her colleagues walked the neighborhood to invite residents to HIV Vaccine Awareness Day

Community-outreach and health workers canvass Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood to publicize HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.

Community-outreach and health workers canvass Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood to publicize HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.

In Freedom Park, a cluster of small businesses offers haircuts and braiding, giant cabbages and avocados, clothing and hand towels.

In Freedom Park, a cluster of small businesses offers haircuts and braiding, giant cabbages and avocados, clothing and hand towels.

The Orlando Towers, the site of a decommissioned coal-fired power station in Soweto, now is a bungee-jump and adventure-sport facility.

The Orlando Towers, the site of a decommissioned coal-fired power station in Soweto, now is a bungee-jump and adventure-sport facility.

Pulane Makhale dries laundry outside her home in Freedom Park.

Pulane Makhale dries laundry outside her home in Freedom Park.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, left, talks with Zodwa Witness Mchunu in her Freedom Park home. Mchunu, 63, lost her adult daughter, Gloria, to AIDS.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase, left, talks with Zodwa Witness Mchunu in her Freedom Park home. Mchunu, 63, lost her adult daughter, Gloria, to AIDS.

“She was everything to me,” Zodwa Witness Mchunu says of her daughter Gloria, who died of AIDS in 2012.

“She was everything to me,” Zodwa Witness Mchunu says of her daughter Gloria, who died of AIDS in 2012.

Students walk through Soweto, a township of shacks and middle-class homes, small “spaza” shops and fancy shopping malls, soccer fields and a University of Johannesburg campus.

Students walk through Soweto, a township of shacks and middle-class homes, small “spaza” shops and fancy shopping malls, soccer fields and a University of Johannesburg campus.

Cook Winnie Malangana works in the kitchen at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood. The nonprofit provides meals and other care for youth and the elderly.

Cook Winnie Malangana works in the kitchen at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood. The nonprofit provides meals and other care for youth and the elderly.

Phumla Madi, second from left, community-liaison manager for the Perinatal HIV Research Unit, gives a speech during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project.

Phumla Madi, second from left, community-liaison manager for the Perinatal HIV Research Unit, gives a speech during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project.

People at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project listen to speeches during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. The event, designed to educate the community about new clinical trials, featured songs, prayers from traditional healers, inspirational talks and condom demonstrations.

People at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project listen to speeches during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. The event, designed to educate the community about new clinical trials, featured songs, prayers from traditional healers, inspirational talks and condom demonstrations.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase talks to the crowd during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. Workers such as Nkase are recruiting participants for two clinical trials, including the antibody mediated prevention study enrolling women in Africa.

Community-engagement worker Puleng Nkase talks to the crowd during HIV Vaccine Awareness Day. Workers such as Nkase are recruiting participants for two clinical trials, including the antibody mediated prevention study enrolling women in Africa.

Laughter marks a light moment at HIV Vaccine Awareness Day in Freedom Park.

Laughter marks a light moment at HIV Vaccine Awareness Day in Freedom Park.

Children eat after school at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Freedom Park. The organization provides health and social-service programs for seniors, as well as homework help, mentoring and meals each day for more than 300 orphaned or disadvantaged children.

Children eat after school at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Freedom Park. The organization provides health and social-service programs for seniors, as well as homework help, mentoring and meals each day for more than 300 orphaned or disadvantaged children.

Winnie Malangana, left, and Poppy Mbatha cook at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project. The nonprofit serves meals to more than 300 children each day, many of them orphans.

Winnie Malangana, left, and Poppy Mbatha cook at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project. The nonprofit serves meals to more than 300 children each day, many of them orphans.

Young men take photos at Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood.

Young men take photos at Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Soweto’s Freedom Park neighborhood.

Phuti Matheba, left, plays chess with Abie Vusi Masango at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Freedom Park.

Phuti Matheba, left, plays chess with Abie Vusi Masango at the Ikusasa Lethu Youth Project in Freedom Park.

The Yeoville neighborhood overlooks downtown Johannesburg — also called Jozi or Jo’burg — South Africa’s largest city, with about 4.4 million people.

The Yeoville neighborhood overlooks downtown Johannesburg — also called Jozi or Jo’burg — South Africa’s largest city, with about 4.4 million people.

Kgomotso Moabi, 19, illuminated by the sunset, talks with friends on the Nelson Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg. Moabi says young people often talk openly about preventing sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, but not as much about their HIV status. “It’s an important thing to think about.”

Kgomotso Moabi, 19, illuminated by the sunset, talks with friends on the Nelson Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg. Moabi says young people often talk openly about preventing sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy, but not as much about their HIV status. “It’s an important thing to think about.”

The Yeoville neighborhood overlooks downtown Johannesburg — also called Jozi or Jo’burg — South Africa’s largest city, with about 4.4 million people.

The Yeoville neighborhood overlooks downtown Johannesburg — also called Jozi or Jo’burg — South Africa’s largest city, with about 4.4 million people.

A woman walks out of Soweto’s Bara Taxi Rank at the end of the day. Many in Soweto commute to downtown Johannesburg for work.

A woman walks out of Soweto’s Bara Taxi Rank at the end of the day. Many in Soweto commute to downtown Johannesburg for work.

Young men talk and smoke hookah in Soweto’s Orlando West neighborhood, where Nelson Mandela once lived.

Young men talk and smoke hookah in Soweto’s Orlando West neighborhood, where Nelson Mandela once lived.

In Soweto, some small businesses — such as laundromats and hair salons — operate out of shipping containers.

In Soweto, some small businesses — such as laundromats and hair salons — operate out of shipping containers.

Mothers and children crowd around nurse Ntomby Maseko as she gives out antiretroviral drugs at Nkosi’s Haven, a Johannesburg home for HIV-positive mothers, their children and orphans. Much has changed since 1999, when Gail Johnson founded the organization named for the foster son she later adopted. “There were traffic jams in the cemetery” from so many AIDS-related deaths, Johnson says. Today, South Africa has the largest antiretroviral treatment program in the world, and people with HIV can lead healthy and fulfilling lives.

Mothers and children crowd around nurse Ntomby Maseko as she gives out antiretroviral drugs at Nkosi’s Haven, a Johannesburg home for HIV-positive mothers, their children and orphans. Much has changed since 1999, when Gail Johnson founded the organization named for the foster son she later adopted. “There were traffic jams in the cemetery” from so many AIDS-related deaths, Johnson says. Today, South Africa has the largest antiretroviral treatment program in the world, and people with HIV can lead healthy and fulfilling lives.

Fani, 2, looks at her mother, left, who is resting in the Nkosi’s Haven sick bay in Johannesburg. The nonprofit offers housing and care for mothers with HIV, their children and orphans, some HIV-positive. The organization last month marked the 15th anniversary of the death of Nkosi Johnson, the founder’s adopted son.

Fani, 2, looks at her mother, left, who is resting in the Nkosi’s Haven sick bay in Johannesburg. The nonprofit offers housing and care for mothers with HIV, their children and orphans, some HIV-positive. The organization last month marked the 15th anniversary of the death of Nkosi Johnson, the founder’s adopted son.

African Methodist Episcopal Church members visit Nkosi’s Haven with the hope of building a relationship to help the organization.

African Methodist Episcopal Church members visit Nkosi’s Haven with the hope of building a relationship to help the organization.

Young South Africans gather at a bar in Johannesburg’s Melville neighborhood. Melville, near two universities, draws a hip crowd for its nightlife, cafes, galleries and shops

Young South Africans gather at a bar in Johannesburg’s Melville neighborhood. Melville, near two universities, draws a hip crowd for its nightlife, cafes, galleries and shops

Fikile Mthombeni, 32, an HIV counselor in Soweto, warns young women to avoid older men known as sugar daddies or “blessers,” who prey on young women needing help with food or tuition. Mthombeni, who grew up in an orphanage and with a grandmother, met an older man while in her final year of high school. “He took advantage of me because I was desperate for money and he has the money but he never told me his (HIV) status.” Still, Mthombeni says, living with HIV has made her stronger and better at her job. “If it didn’t happen, maybe I wouldn’t be that far now in life.”

Fikile Mthombeni, 32, an HIV counselor in Soweto, warns young women to avoid older men known as sugar daddies or “blessers,” who prey on young women needing help with food or tuition. Mthombeni, who grew up in an orphanage and with a grandmother, met an older man while in her final year of high school. “He took advantage of me because I was desperate for money and he has the money but he never told me his (HIV) status.” Still, Mthombeni says, living with HIV has made her stronger and better at her job. “If it didn’t happen, maybe I wouldn’t be that far now in life.”

The five-story mural on O.R. Tambo Hall in Khayelitsha was created to spread the message that HIV is no longer a death sentence, and to combat stigmas associated with diagnosis and taking antiretrovirals. HIV activist Andile Madondile had a hand in this World AIDS Day 2015 project and helped come up with the “Life Beyond HIV” slogan.

The five-story mural on O.R. Tambo Hall in Khayelitsha was created to spread the message that HIV is no longer a death sentence, and to combat stigmas associated with diagnosis and taking antiretrovirals. HIV activist Andile Madondile had a hand in this World AIDS Day 2015 project and helped come up with the “Life Beyond HIV” slogan.

Sithembele Madondile and her husband, HIV activist Andile Madondile, get their children ready for school in their one-bedroom home in Cape Town’s Khayelitsha township. Andile Madondile says neighbors know of his HIV status, and he’s become a positive example. “When people see me, I just motivate them,” he says.

Sithembele Madondile and her husband, HIV activist Andile Madondile, get their children ready for school in their one-bedroom home in Cape Town’s Khayelitsha township. Andile Madondile says neighbors know of his HIV status, and he’s become a positive example. “When people see me, I just motivate them,” he says.

Sithembele Madondile, 33, washes clothes in her living room in Khayelitsha. Her husband, HIV activist Andile Madondile, says his dream is to leave their one-bedroom shack and purchase a better home, see their three children attend college and help his wife go back to school.

Sithembele Madondile, 33, washes clothes in her living room in Khayelitsha. Her husband, HIV activist Andile Madondile, says his dream is to leave their one-bedroom shack and purchase a better home, see their three children attend college and help his wife go back to school.

Laundry hangs between homes in Khayelitsha.

Laundry hangs between homes in Khayelitsha.

At home in Khayelitsha, Sithembele Madondile combs son Onako’s hair before school. Sithembele, who is HIV-negative, and her husband, Andile Madondile, 38, an HIV-positive health activist, have three children. None has HIV.

At home in Khayelitsha, Sithembele Madondile combs son Onako’s hair before school. Sithembele, who is HIV-negative, and her husband, Andile Madondile, 38, an HIV-positive health activist, have three children. None has HIV.

Housing in Khayelitsha ranges from brick homes to expanses of shacks that lack indoor plumbing and are susceptible to fast-moving fires. Khayelitsha means “new home” in Xhosa.

Housing in Khayelitsha ranges from brick homes to expanses of shacks that lack indoor plumbing and are susceptible to fast-moving fires. Khayelitsha means “new home” in Xhosa.

Young men travel through Khayelitsha at sunset.

Young men travel through Khayelitsha at sunset.

Andile Madondile’s son Agcobile, 7, left, plays with friends Matatiyele and Miviyo.

Andile Madondile’s son Agcobile, 7, left, plays with friends Matatiyele and Miviyo.

A DJ performs for residents in Khayelitsha on the weekend. Neighbors gathered for dancing and drinks at a braai, a South African barbecue.

A DJ performs for residents in Khayelitsha on the weekend. Neighbors gathered for dancing and drinks at a braai, a South African barbecue.

During the weekend, residents gather in Khayelitsha for dancing and drinks at a braai, a South African barbecue.

During the weekend, residents gather in Khayelitsha for dancing and drinks at a braai, a South African barbecue.

Residents in Khayelitsha enjoy dancing and drinks at a weekend braai, a South African barbecue.

Residents in Khayelitsha enjoy dancing and drinks at a weekend braai, a South African barbecue.

In the early morning, sanitation workers push containers filled with sewage from Khayelitsha’s outhouses.

In the early morning, sanitation workers push containers filled with sewage from Khayelitsha’s outhouses.

Thandile Mazula, 19, far right, who is taking part in a vaccine trial, sings with a choir at his home in Gugulethu, a township outside Cape Town. He remembers when many young people lost their parents to HIV and funerals were held every weekend. “We want South Africa to be a very, very, very beautiful country, beautiful place, whereby our grand-grandchildren can live a happy, healthy life.” (Erika Schultz/The Seattle Times)

Thandile Mazula, 19, far right, who is taking part in a vaccine trial, sings with a choir at his home in Gugulethu, a township outside Cape Town. He remembers when many young people lost their parents to HIV and funerals were held every weekend. “We want South Africa to be a very, very, very beautiful country, beautiful place, whereby our grand-grandchildren can live a happy, healthy life.” (Erika Schultz/The Seattle Times)

FinalFinalPaige

Finding love is no longer the product of kismet, or even boozy nights out, but regimented, analytical, ruthless searches for perfection. Pacific Northwest Magazine Story by Tricia Romano.

Gabrielle Hooks Age: 27 Dates: Women Looking for: A long-term relationship Apps and websites: Tinder, OKCupid, HER Hobbies: Karaoke, aquarium fish-keeping On online dating: “There comes a point when you’ve swiped through all of Seattle, then there’s no one left. Then you’re like, ‘Oh, now what do I do?’ Then, you get a new app, and then you swipe through that app, and you’re like, ‘Shoot.’ Hopefully you’ll have a girlfriend by then.”

Gabrielle Hooks
Age: 27
Dates: Women
Looking for: A long-term relationship
Apps and websites: Tinder, OKCupid, HER
Hobbies: Karaoke, aquarium fish-keeping
On online dating: “There comes a point when you’ve swiped through all of Seattle, then there’s no one left. Then you’re like, ‘Oh, now what do I do?’ Then, you get a new app, and then you swipe through that app, and you’re like, ‘Shoot.’ Hopefully you’ll have a girlfriend by then.”

Frankie Rentas Age: 33 Dates: Men Looking for: Relationship Apps and websites: OKCupid, Grindr, Scruff Hobbies: Sings second tenor in the Seattle Men's Chorus On online dating: “It's incredibly exhausting ... not so much the physical doing it. It’s the fact that that’s 15 years later, nothing changed, no results. I always thought I’d be married by now. It’s such a part of my life. I would love a life without any of these things.”

Frankie Rentas
Age: 33
Dates: Men
Looking for: Relationship
Apps and websites: OKCupid, Grindr, Scruff
Hobbies: Sings second tenor in the Seattle Men’s Chorus
On online dating: “It’s incredibly exhausting … not so much the physical doing it. It’s the fact that that’s 15 years later, nothing changed, no results. I always thought I’d be married by now. It’s such a part of my life. I would love a life without any of these things.”

Jonathan Zwickel Age: 41 Dates: Women Looking for: Relationship Apps and websites: OKCupid, Tinder, Hinge Hobbies: Backpacking, mountaineering, snowboarding, live music On online dating: “I spend time using these apps so that I can meet someone, so that I can delete all the apps and never use them again. But the more time I spend using them, the more likely I am to meet that someone. So it’s this weird Catch-22 or self-perpetuating cycle. All I want to do is never look at OKCupid again. I would rather wake up and look at a person than wake up and look at my phone.”

Jonathan Zwickel
Age: 41
Dates: Women
Looking for: Relationship
Apps and websites: OKCupid, Tinder, Hinge
Hobbies: Backpacking, mountaineering, snowboarding, live music
On online dating: “I spend time using these apps so that I can meet someone, so that I can delete all the apps and never use them again. But the more time I spend using them, the more likely I am to meet that someone. So it’s this weird Catch-22 or self-perpetuating cycle. All I want to do is never look at OKCupid again. I would rather wake up and look at a person than wake up and look at my phone.”

Liang Shi Age: 29 Dates: Men Looking for: Relationship Apps and websites: Match.com, Siren, OKCupid, Plenty of Fish, Tinder, Hinge, Bumble, Coffee Meets Bagel Hobbies: Gym, yoga, football, water sports, visiting cool spots in Seattle, her dog, art galleries On online dating: “My online dating cycle is almost like if you were applying at jobs. You get on, and you shoot out all of these messages, right? And then you just wait for them to trickle back.”

Liang Shi
Age: 29
Dates: Men
Looking for: Relationship
Apps and websites: Match.com, Siren, OKCupid, Plenty of Fish, Tinder, Hinge, Bumble, Coffee Meets Bagel
Hobbies: Gym, yoga, football, water sports, visiting cool spots in Seattle, her dog, art galleries
On online dating: “My online dating cycle is almost like if you were applying at jobs. You get on, and you shoot out all of these messages, right? And then you just wait for them to trickle back.”


Online shopping vs. online dating – Erika Schultz, Corinne Chin, and Thomas Wilburn / The Seattle Times


Why online date? – Erika Schultz, Corinne Chin, and Thomas Wilburn / The Seattle Times


It’s like work – Erika Schultz, Corinne Chin, and Thomas Wilburn / The Seattle Times

At the Kayser Ranch in eastern Washington, raising cattle is a family tradition. And 20-year-old Shelby is poised to take over the business.

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Shelby Kayser, 20, a fifth-generation rancher, center, brands calves on her family’s cattle ranch Thursday, April 9, 2015 near Centerville, Washington. Over four days last week, Kayser worked with family and a group of more than fifteen friends and neighbors to brand, vaccinate, castrate and apply topical applications on fur to prevent parasites, lice and ticks.
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Nate Kayser helps separate cattle before branding and vaccinating at his ranch Thursday, April 9, 2015 near Centerville, Washington. “He’s the hardest working person you’ll ever meet,” said his daughter Shelby Kayser. “Loving, caring, awesome and cowboy’s cowboy.”
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Shelby Kayser saddles her quarter horse before gathering cows and calves near Centerville, Washington.
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Gordon Johnson, left, and Grayson Jensen sip coffee over breakfast at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington. Friends, family and neighbors helped the Kaysers with four days of branding last week. Breakfast was served at around 6:30 a.m.
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Nate Kayser gathers calves and cows for branding at his ranch located near the Columbia River. Mount Hood is seen behind.
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Shelby Kayser, left, and friends and family gather cattle from the Columbia Hills move them into the branding corrals. More than 15 people volunteered to help the Kaysers with the four-day branding last week.
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Will Sizemore vaccinates cattle at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015. “They need those vaccinations like the human population needs to the flu shot,” said Nate Kayser. “If they donÕt get those vaccinations they get sick and die.”
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Shelby Kayser prepares for the cattle branding in the Columbia Hills, near the Columbia River. “I take pride in the fact that I work hard to be a good cowboy,” she said. “It means getting up and doing the work when it’s not fun and it means feeding those cows when the snow is knee deep. Being a good cowboy doesn’t mean that I wait for my dad and my cousin Will to come fix the problem. It means I can do it by myself.”
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A calf sneaks between Grayson Jensen’s legs and lifts him up during branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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Randell Scull works during a branding session at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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Cows congregate at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015. Shelby Kayser believes humans can learn a lesson from the animals. “Cows are a herd animal, naturally, so they care about the well being of each other,” she said. “They don’t, you know, pick one out and bully it.”
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Nate Kayser raised his two daughters on his own while running a rural cattle ranch, near Mount Adams and the Columbia River. “They’ve learned responsibility, common sense,” he said.
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Will Sizemore gathers his rope while working at the branding Thursday, April 9, 2015 near Centerville, Washington. Sizemore is a relative of the Kaysers.
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A calf brings Randell Scull to the ground during branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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After being gathered from the Columbia Hills, cowboys separate the cows and their calves during branding. The animals were branded, vaccinated, castrated and had a topical application applied to their coat to prevent parasites, lice and ticks.
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Marshall Bruhan, 6, center, prepares to rope calves with other children during branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch. ItÕs a tradition for children to rope the last group of calves to gain experience.
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Nate Kayser, from left, and Will Sizemore chat during branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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Nate Kayser, from left, and Will Sizemore chat during branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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Randell Scull breaks after branding sessions at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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Shelby Kayser rides through the Columbia Hills before cattle branding. She loves the lifestyle, the panoramic views and the cows and horses. “I love being able taking care of the animals,Ó she said. ÒIÕve learned how to take care of them myself.”
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Shane Scott, 9, swings the barn after helping with branding at the Nate Kayser Ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015.
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After a long day, Nancy Sizemore leaves the branding grounds. Shelby Kayser, 20, said sheÕs learned a lot of lessons and toughness from her aunts
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Shelby Kayser, 20, finishes up the day at the branding corrals at her fatherÕs ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015. ÒNo amount of money could make me sell this ranch because ÂÂbasically I love what I do,Ó she said.
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Shelby Kayser closes the day at her fatherÕs cattle ranch near Centerville, Washington Thursday, April 9, 2015. “It’s like a celebration of a successful calving season,” said Shelby Kayser. “That always makes you feel goodÑ like you worked hard and did your job and you took care of your animals and it shows.”