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Deacon Teklewoyine Abel carries a cross during a procession at the annual Saint Abuna Aregawi celebration outside St. Emmanuel Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church in Beacon Hill Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013. Aregawi was one of nine saints that traveled in exile from Rome to Ethiopia, and later founded the monastery Debre Damo, said Dawit Huluka, a St. Emmanuel deacon. Hundreds of local Ethiopian and Eritreans, coming from five local churches, gathered for several hours Saturday night, then returned as early as 3 a.m. Sunday for prayers, hymns and a community meal. Orthodox priests carried the tabot, a replica of the Ark of the Covenant, on their head counterclockwise around the church during the procession. “It’s always about God.” Huluka said. “It’s always about thanking him for his blessings and his mercy.”

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Just below the Columbia Hills, Ken Peterson and Dustin Cameron, 28, start out on the second day of the Cameron Bros. Ranches cattle drive in Klickitat County, Washington. The Cameron family, ranchers for at least a century, recently completed a three-day cattle drive that moved about 600 cows and calves from High Prairie to their summer pastures 32 miles away. Only a handful of long-distance cattle drives still occur in Washington state, said Jack Field, executive vice president of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association.

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Members of the Bhutanese Nepali Christian Community sing during a Saturday worship service at their pastor’s apartment in Tukwila. The Bhutanese — who are also Hindu and Buddhist— began to arrive in starting in 2008 after living in refugee camps in Nepal. Many of the Bhutanese refugees were settled in South King County and Everett, said Bob Johnson, executive director of International Rescue Committee Seattle. As of February 2013, about 65,075 Bhutanese have been resettled throughout the United States.
Barsha Sangraula, 11, left, and Bandana Sangraula, 9, play around their apartment complex in Tukwila. The girls, whose family is from Nepal, said their friends at school speak a variety of languages including Spanish, Nepali and Somali.

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Army veteran Ben Rye, 33, walks with a Lokomat, a robotic gait system, at the non-profit Pushing Boundaries in Redmond, Wash. Pushing Boundaries is the only non-medical facility in Washington State that provides exercise therapy to people with paralysis. “Clients can come to us after they’ve gone through the medical arena, but still want to work on regaining function and independence,” said Suzette Hart, of Pushing Boundaries. Rye suffered a traumatic brain injury from a car accident while stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia August 2009. It took Rye a year to talk again after living five months in a coma and being treated at multiple medical facilities around the country. Rye continues to make steady progress towards his goals of walking freely and without help.

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Runners marvel at a bubble and black light station at the Electric Run, a traveling 5K run and walk with intricate light installations and electronic music. The event drew almost 10,000 runners and walkers to Puyallup Fair & Events Center in Washington state.

Josie Mustafa, 25, left in front, and Abby McMillan, 24, embrace during candlelight vigil at the Transgender Day of Remembrance at the Ravenna United Methodist Church Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Attendees took turns reading the names of names, ages and circumstances of how 173 individuals were murdered around the world because of transgender hate or prejudice since Nov. 2012. Mustafa, who identifies as transgender, said she left Kuwait after an assault a little more than a year ago. “I honestly thought I was going to die that night,” she said. “I realized I had no human rights.” The Emerald City Club and Social Outreach Seattle sponsored the event designed to raise awareness of transgender hate crimes and honor murdered individuals from around the world.

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Noel Gomez, a former prostitute who co-founded the Organization for Prostitution Survivors, is raising money for a memorial to the victims of Green River killer Gary L. Ridgway, who has pleaded guilty to 49 murders. “I feel like they are my sisters,” Gomez said, about the victims, many who were also caught up in the dark underworld of prostitution. “I think there’s a lot of people who don’t think about it or even know about it. But what people don’t understand is that in certain circles, it’s still a huge freaking wound.”

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Holly Deierling, 21, in white, dances to the electronic beats of A Trak at the Capitol Hill Block Party in Seattle.

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Michael Parker wears his yellow suit, cross and last supper necklace to the Beacon Hill First Baptist Church on Easter/ Parker said he has been attending services at the congregation since 1982. “I like to wear loud colors,” he said.

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Dressed for the elements, Nevaeh Spencer, 9, rallies the crowd with the Rainier Ravens Cheer Squad during the South King County Junior Football League playoffs at Foster High School in Tukwila Sunday, October 27, 2013. The South King County Junior Football League, started in 1952, offers football and cheerleading for youth ages five to 14. The championships will be held next weekend. “I’m in my cocoon,” Spencer said.

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Emily Sayers, 9, holds the hand of her 7-month-old sister Abigail Sayers at Seattle Children’s Hospital Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013. Abigail, born at 24 weeks, has undergone five brain surgeries, four cardiac arrests and currently breathes through a tracheostomy tube. “Christmas is a time about giving and caring for others,” Emily said. “I feel bad for her that she’s in the hospital.”

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Barsha Sangraula CQ, 11, left, and Bandana SangraulaCQ, 9, play around their apartment complex in Tukwila. The girls, whose family is from Nepal, said their friends at school speak a variety of languages including Spanish, Nepali and Somali.

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Ma Thao, 55, transports flowers at Shong Chaos Farm on a recent evening near Fall City, Wash. The family works very long days during the peak of the summer to provide pesticide-free bouquets at Pike Place Market. There are roughly about 90 Hmong flower farms in Washington state, said Bee Cha, Washington State University extension immigrant specialist.

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Runners marvel at a bubble and black light station at the Electric Run, a traveling 5K run and walk with intricate light installations and electronic music. The event drew almost 10,000 runners and walkers to Puyallup Fair & Events Center in Washington state August, 25, 2013.

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Participants compete in the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan, Washington on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. Three-man teams attempt to saddle and ride an unbroken horse only aided by a lead rope. One Yakama Indian family hosts the event each year in honor of their loved ones who have died.

Organizers say there has been a decline in wild horse races in the past 10 to 15 years due to pressure from animal activists. However, the Heemsah family and friends believe wild horse racing is an important part of Native American heritage, and is important for tribes.
Brittany Shotk, 17, center, watches cowboys and cowgirls prepare behind shoots at the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race CQ in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. The Heemsah family puts on the annual event, and attracts participants from around the Northwest.

“It’s an excitement that brings us life,” said Emery Benson, an attendee. “We are horse people.”

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Brittany Shotk, 17, center, watches cowboys and cowgirls prepare behind shoots at the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race CQ in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. The Heemsah family puts on the annual event, and attracts participants from around the Northwest.

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Participants bow their head in memoriam of the Heemsah brothers and their mother Sadie Cloud Heemsah. Leon “Stinky” Heemsah, a Yakama-enrolled cowboy, started the competition in 1995 in their honor.

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Marcus Shock, 24, feeds unbroken horses after the first day of the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. Attendee Emery Benson said native tribes have been breaking untamed horses for centuries, using them for transportation to sustain their livelihood.

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Cowboys change clothes after competing in the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013.

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An unbroken horse drags Danny Heemsah, wearing black, and Adrian Jackson through the dirt during the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race at the rodeo grounds in White Swan on the Yakama Nation, Washington Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. Three-man teams attempt to saddle and ride an unbroken horse, only aided by a lead rope.

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Several hundred spectators watch the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013.

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Jacob Spencer tapes Cameron Adams’ fingers before competing at the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013.

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Casey Heemsah, 29, left, and Emery Benson relax after the first day of the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race in White Swan on the Yakama Nation. Benson said native tribes have been breaking untamed horses for centuries, using them for transportation to sustain their livelihood. “It’s an excitement that brings us life,” he said. “We are horse people.”

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Leon “Stinky” Heemsah shows off one of his scars. Heemsah competed in 46 years of wild horse racing with his brothers. He went into retirement after seven broken ribs in Omak, a broken arm in Pendleton and a cracked ankle in Reno. Leon started the competition in 1995 in honor of his diseased relatives.

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Mother Peggy Heemsah, left, touches heads with her daughter Jessica Heemsah at the end of the day near the fry bread tent. Part of the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse Race is keeping strong ties between generations of family.

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Bobby Bobb competes in the junior colt race during the Heemsah Memorial Wild Horse in White Swan on the Yakama Nation Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013.

For more info, please visit The Seattle Times, “A Wild Weekend for Horse Tamers.”

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Workers bring down bags of freshly picked Arabica at Badra Estates' Bettadakhan Estate. The forested plantation, located in a mountain range called the Bababudan Giris, is no stranger to coffee pests like Indian wild bison, elephants and king cobras.
Workers bring down bags of freshly picked Arabica at Badra Estates’ Bettadakhan Estate. The forested plantation, located in a mountain range called the Bababudan Giris, is no stranger to coffee pests like Indian wild bison, elephants and king cobras.

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Vijayalakshmy, 33, picks Robusta at Badra Estates. Most of the coffee grown in India is Robusta. Although Robusta’s reputation has improved, Starbucks and other high-end roasters still do not use it.

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The orange hues of a December sunrise illuminate the misty hills of Karnataka in southern India. Coffee is grown mostly in the south, including Karnataka, while tea is grown mostly in the north.

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Hindu priest Shivashankar, in orange, works in a temple at the highest point in the Bababudan Giris. According to legend, the 17-century Muslim pilgrim Baba Budan smuggled coffee beans from Yemen, introducing the crop to India. Coffee fields are now visible in all directions.

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Kushma, a coffee worker of 25 years, wears a bindi like many Hindu women. She picks coffee at Balanoor Plantations, which also cultivates a variety of other crops including tea, coffee, pepper and rubber.

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Women sort freshly picked coffee cherries at Badra Estates in December. Women often wear men’s dress shirts while working in the fields. Despite benefits including maternity leave and free childcare, India’s coffee estates suffer from a labor shortage.

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Children pray before eating lunch at Balanoor Government Higher Primary School, built by the plantation in the 1990s for workers’ children. The government pays for school salaries and other expenses.

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Laxmi, 65, works in Balanoor Plantations’ tea fields in Karnataka.

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Women workers hoist bags of Arabica into loading trucks at Balanoor Plantations workers in Karnataka. The Indian government pooled and sold farmers’ coffee until the 1990s, when growers started marketing it themselves, improving quality and profits.

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After the workday, a workers gather water at worker housing at Badra Estates.

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A baby lies in its crib at a Badra Estates coffee plantation. Mothers apply kohl to a child’s face to ward off the “evil eye.”

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Prabhamani cooks inside her family’s kitchen at Badra Estates’ worker housing. Many of the kitchen stoves are fueled by wood. But, the housing offers electricity and other amenities.

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Balanoor Plantations workers pluck tea by hand and with shears, then place the leaves in the bag that is slung on the head with a strap. Tea is manufactured year-round, while coffee, grown in nearby fields, is only harvested once a year.

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Mashawari, 24, harvests tea at Balanoor Plantations. The leaves are eventually made into black tea.

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Balanoor Plantations workers harvest tea in the early morning at their Murgadhi division in Karnataka, India. Employees navigate narrow paths through the dense bushes, which are about waist-level for most people.

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Thara, 30, works in Balanoor Plantations’ tea fields in Karnataka. Workers pluck tea by hand and with shears, then place the leaves in the bag that is slung on the head with a strap.

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Tea workers head into the fields at Balanoor Plantations Murgadhi division in Karnataka, India. Tea needs to be harvested every 18 days, said Rohan Kuriyan, manager of corporate affairs. Due to labor shortages, the company can only do it every 22 days.

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A Hindu leader engages in puja, a religious ritual, for Balanoor Plantations workers after the workday. Balanoor has nine Hindu temples. The temple priests and religious leaders also work by day in the plantations.

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Neka Ton, facing camera, helps Tiffany Chin with her headdress while traveling with the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team. The drill team- comprised of girls from the fifth to 12th grades- celebrated its 60th anniversary last year. The team showcases precision, military-style marching led by a captain’s commands. They wear replica Chinese opera costumes in red, signifying good luck. The team practices on Saturdays, April through July, and focuses on values of education, community service, discipline, leadership and sisterhood.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team practice in Seward Park’s tennis courts before performing at the 23rd Annual Walk for Rice. The group, which began in 1952 with the help of Ruby Chow, learned their drills the Seattle Police Department marching drill team.

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Lizzy Wong, center, and Michelle Pan, right, prepare for a performance with the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team at the Chong Wa Benevolent Association.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team dress to perform at the 23rd Annual Walk for Rice in Seward Park, which benefits the Asian Counseling and Referral Service.

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Cheryl Kojima, third from the left, practices with the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team at the Chong Wa Benevolent Association.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team prepare to practice at the Chong Wa Benevolent Association. The drill team- comprised of girls from the fifth to 12th grades- celebrated its 60th anniversary last year.

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The Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team wears replica Chinese opera costumes in red to signify good luck.

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The Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team practice in the Chong Wa Benevolent Association. The team performs to symbols, a snare drum and a Chinese bass drum.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team ride the bus to perform at the 23rd Annual Walk for Rice in Seward Park, which benefits the Asian Counseling and Referral Service. The team is comprised of members from Lynnwood to Kent, Issaquah to Whidbey Island.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team ride to bus to perform at the 23rd Annual Walk for Rice in Seward Park, which benefits the Asian Counseling and Referral Service. The team is comprised of members from Lynnwood to Kent, from Issaquah to Whidbey Island.

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Capitan Katie Zhong, the highest-ranking officer in the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team, gets a bit of help with her headdress. The feathers signify authority. The longer the feather, the higher the rank.
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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team practice in the Seward Park tennis courts. They practice on Saturdays from April through July so the team can focus on their schoolwork the rest of the year. The team performs at parades and community events throughout the summer.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team practice in the Seward Park tennis courts. They practice on Saturdays from April through July so the team can focus on their schoolwork the rest of the year. The team performs at parades and community events throughout the summer.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team practice in the Seward Park tennis courts. The team practices on Saturdays from April through July so the team can focus on their schoolwork the rest of the year. The team performs at parades and community events throughout the summer.

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Members of the Seattle Chinese Community Girls Drill Team wait before boarding their bus at Seward Park. The drill team focuses on having fun, fostering sisterhood and offering the members life skills to be engaged citizens.

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