Animator and illustrator Drew Christie is photographed near his home and studio near Langley, Washington. Christie finds inspiration from folk music, photos and films and

Animator and illustrator Drew Christie is photographed near his home and studio near Langley, Washington. Christie finds inspiration from folk music, photos and films and

Drew Christie, who contributes “op-docs” to The New York Times, is a former winner of The Seattle Times and SIFF’s 3 Minute Masterpiece contest. To read more of his work, visit our Seattle Times profile.

Drew Christie holds a block print in his studio near Langley.

Drew Christie holds a block print in his studio near Langley.

Animator and illustrator Drew Christie is photographed near his home and studio near Langley, Washington. Christie finds inspiration from folk music, photos and films and books.

Animator and illustrator Drew Christie is photographed near his home and studio near Langley, Washington. Christie finds inspiration from folk music, photos and films and books.

Drew Christie, an animator and illustrator, created an illustrated encyclopedia of folk instruments. The hand-drawn book of more than 100 pages was created over six years.

Drew Christie, an animator and illustrator, created an illustrated encyclopedia of folk instruments. The hand-drawn book of more than 100 pages was created over six years.

Rudy Pablo Matias, 19, hauls freshly-picked salal, an evergreen shrub used in flower arrangements, near Belfair, Wash.

Rudy Pablo Matias, 19, hauls freshly-picked salal, an evergreen shrub used in flower arrangements, near Belfair, Wash.


Matias and other workers sell the salal to Continental Floral, the largest floral foliage-producing company in the Pacific Northwest.

Mother’s Day is the company’s busiest time selling salal, with Valentine’s Day coming in second. “Not everyone has a girlfriend or wife, but everyone has a mother,” said Scott Schauer, general manager.

The salal plants are harvested by individuals with permits, cleaned and packaged at Continental and then distributed around the world. On average, the company dispatches 15 shipping containers of salal worldwide each week.

Schauer said brush picking has been an active industry in Washington state since at least 1915, and both sides of his grandparents have been brush pickers or managed brush plants. “Some of the ground that people pick on have been picked for 100 years,” he said. “At one time, it (salal) was a cottage industry. One hundred years later, it’s one of the three most used foliages used in floral arrangements in the world.”

A brush picker’s glove sits out during a lunch break in the forest near Belfair.

A brush picker’s glove sits out during a lunch break in the forest near Belfair.


Joseph Morales works inside the cold storage at Continental Floral LLC near Belfair. Wooden bins of salal are behind. “Salal is unique in that it has a long life span if you properly take care of it,” said Scott Schauer, general manager. In a cooler it can last four months.

Joseph Morales works inside the cold storage at Continental Floral LLC near Belfair. Wooden bins of salal are behind. “Salal is unique in that it has a long life span if you properly take care of it,” said Scott Schauer, general manager. In a cooler it can last four months.

Mike Fitzsimmons unpacks a truck load of salal at Continental Floral LLC.

Mike Fitzsimmons unpacks a truck load of salal at Continental Floral LLC.

Salal, an evergreen shrub, grows throughout the Pacific Northwest’s forest floor. It can often be found under Douglas fir, hemlock and spruce.

Salal, an evergreen shrub, grows throughout the Pacific Northwest’s forest floor. It can often be found under Douglas fir, hemlock and spruce.

Wooden bins are stacked at Continental Floral. During the Christmas season, the bins are used for holding wreath-making supplies and materials

Wooden bins are stacked at Continental Floral. During the Christmas season, the bins are used for holding wreath-making supplies and materials

Brush pickers bind bunches of salal in the forest. Salal is sold by the bunch.

Brush pickers bind bunches of salal in the forest. Salal is sold by the bunch.

Workers collect salal in the forest near Belfair. An average brush picker collects about 150 bunches a day.

Workers collect salal in the forest near Belfair. An average brush picker collects about 150 bunches a day.

Rudy Pablo Matias collects salal in the forest near Belfair. The salal plants are harvested by individuals with permits, cleaned and packaged Continental and then distributed around the world, mostly Europe.

Rudy Pablo Matias collects salal in the forest near Belfair. The salal plants are harvested by individuals with permits, cleaned and packaged Continental and then distributed around the world, mostly Europe.

Cesar Andres, 30, hauls salal near Belfair.

Cesar Andres, 30, hauls salal near Belfair.

Salal pickers unload their bounty at the end of the day.

Salal pickers unload their bounty at the end of the day.

Salal leaves, and other harvest plants, collect on the floor of a truck at Continental Floral LLC.

Salal leaves, and other harvest plants, collect on the floor of a truck at Continental Floral LLC.

Fearing for relatives: Kadija Hussein, 34, owner of a Tukwila day care, holds son Ayyub Osmond, 3, one of her four children. She and her husband, a Port of Seattle truck driver, send about $500 a month back to family in Somalia, helping keep relatives’ children in school, food on the table and roofs over their heads. “In Somalia, there are no jobs,” Hussein said.

Fearing for relatives: Kadija Hussein, 34, owner of a Tukwila day care, holds son Ayyub Osmond, 3, one of her four children. She and her husband, a Port of Seattle truck driver, send about $500 a month back to family in Somalia, helping keep relatives’ children in school, food on the table and roofs over their heads. “In Somalia, there are no jobs,” Hussein said.

After a bank pullout, Washington state’s Somali Americans struggle to send money to their families in Africa. To read more about the issue, read Kyung M. Song’s article in The Seattle Times.

Kadija Hussein shares a cellphone photo of her cousin Amina, left, and grandmother Fatima in Somalia. Hussein and her husband send money to help pay for food, doctor visits, funerals and other needs.

Kadija Hussein shares a cellphone photo of her cousin Amina, left, and grandmother Fatima in Somalia. Hussein and her husband send money to help pay for food, doctor visits, funerals and other needs.

Talks with officials: Mohammed Jama, executive director of Abu-Bakr Islamic Center of Washington, wearing a salmon-colored sweater, said he appreciates having been in talks with Gov. Jay Inslee and U.S. Rep. Adam Smith about the closure of money transfers to Somalia from Washington state. Jama says that most in his Tukwila congregation regularly send money back to Somalia. He does so himself, Jama said, to help his brothers and 73-year-old father.

Talks with officials: Mohammed Jama, executive director of Abu-Bakr Islamic Center of Washington, wearing a salmon-colored sweater, said he appreciates having been in talks with Gov. Jay Inslee and U.S. Rep. Adam Smith about the closure of money transfers to Somalia from Washington state. Jama says that most in his Tukwila congregation regularly send money back to Somalia. He does so himself, Jama said, to help his brothers and 73-year-old father.

Abdulhakim Hashi, a Somali money-transfer agent in SeaTac,estimates he sends $22 million a year from U.S. clients to relatives in Somalia and in Kenya and Ethiopia refugee camps.

Abdulhakim Hashi, a Somali money-transfer agent in SeaTac,estimates he sends $22 million a year from U.S. clients to relatives in Somalia and in Kenya and Ethiopia refugee camps.

Ahmed Isse, 85, says he served as an ambassador for the Somali government in the 1970s and remembers when the government offered free schooling. But today, he said, there is little health care or government infrastructure left in his home country. He sends money home to relatives each month to help with food, medicine and schooling.

Ahmed Isse, 85, says he served as an ambassador for the Somali government in the 1970s and remembers when the government offered free schooling. But today, he said, there is little health care or government infrastructure left in his home country. He sends money home to relatives each month to help with food, medicine and schooling.

Doug Joseph, left, of Yelm, and Kevin Cameron, of Puyallup, leave Grayland Beach after digging for razor clams on the Pacific Coast on Wednesday.

Doug Joseph, left, of Yelm, and Kevin Cameron, of Puyallup, leave Grayland Beach after digging for razor clams on the Pacific Coast on Wednesday.

More than 1,100 people searched for razor clams on Wednesday night, said Clayton Parson, scientific technician with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). WDFW approved digs from Feb. 15-22 and has proposed digs throughout March, depending if marine-toxin tests indicate clams are safe to consume.

According to WDFW the best digging typically occurs one to two hours before low tide. No digging is allowed at any beach before noon. Razor clams may be taken by hand, hand-operated shovel or tube. For more information, visit the Department of Fish and Wildlife website.

Razor clams usually live three to five years and grow up to 6 inches in length.

Razor clams usually live three to five years and grow up to 6 inches in length.

Water doesn’t deter Teddy Rothrock, of Matlock, from burrowing her arm into the sand for clams at Grayland Beach on Wednesday. Millions of clams will be harvested this year from Washington beaches during the 2014-2015 razor clamming season.

Water doesn’t deter Teddy Rothrock, of Matlock, from burrowing her arm into the sand for clams at Grayland Beach on Wednesday. Millions of clams will be harvested this year from Washington beaches during the 2014-2015 razor clamming season.


SPD’s Vice & High Risk Victims Unit and the Des Moines Police Department run a hotel string operation to arrest prospective sex buyers answering online ads. Video by Erika Schultz and Bettina Hansen/ The Seattle Times. A great read from Sara Jean Green: “Tougher police tactics stinging sex buyers.

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Seattle Seahawks fans celebrate winning the Super Bowl over a bonfire on the corner of 1st Avenue and Yesler Way in Seattle’s Pioneer Square neighborhood Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.

Thousands of fans walk next to CenturyLink Field during the Seattle Seahawks victory parade in Seattle Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014.

Thousands of fans walk next to CenturyLink Field during the Seattle Seahawks victory parade in Seattle Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014.

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Thousands of Seattle Seahawk fans celebrate their Super Bowl win against the Denver Broncos in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.

Thousands of Seattle Seahawk fans celebrate their Super Bowl win against the Denver Broncos in Seattle’s Pioneer Square neighborhood Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.

Thousands of Seattle Seahawk fans celebrate their Super Bowl win against the Denver Broncos in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.

Thousands of Seattle Seahawk fans celebrate their Super Bowl win against the Denver Broncos in Seattle’s Pioneer Square neighborhood Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014.

Reflected in a car window, Ron Dunphy, a busker, mingles with friends at Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington during a rain shower. Of the 142.5 square miles that make up this city’s total area, 58.7 square miles are water. Geographically speaking, Seattle is almost half liquid— not even counting the 36 inches of it that falls from the sky on average each year. Although many people complain about the weather, the moist climate can make everyday scenes seem painterly.  "I like the rain," Dunphy says. "It knocks the pollutants out of the air. I can smell the trees. It makes it cozy. It makes your pillow more comfortable back home."

Reflected in a car window, Ron Dunphy, a busker, mingles with friends at Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington during a rain shower. Of the 142.5 square miles that make up this city’s total area, 58.7 square miles are water. Geographically speaking, Seattle is almost half liquid— not even counting the 36 inches of it that falls from the sky on average each year. Although many people complain about the weather, the moist climate can make everyday scenes seem painterly. “I like the rain,” Dunphy says. “It knocks the pollutants out of the air. I can smell the trees. It makes it cozy. It makes your pillow more comfortable back home.”

We are water: In it, on it, around it all the time, it shapes us,” from Tyrone Beason, is a beautifully-written ode to Seattle’s moody atmosphere.

A portrait of Lauren Ylvisaker, is taken after a rainy practice with the Highline Premier Football Club at Hiawatha Playfield in West Seattle.

A portrait of Lauren Ylvisaker, is taken after a rainy practice with the Highline Premier Football Club at Hiawatha Playfield in West Seattle.

At dusk, The Great Wheel on the Seattle waterfront offers glimmering, dramatic views of the city's skyline and Elliott Bay. The climate-controlled gondolas shield passengers from the elements, while offering vistas from 175-foot tall Ferris-wheel.

At dusk, The Great Wheel on the Seattle waterfront offers glimmering, dramatic views of the city’s skyline and Elliott Bay. The climate-controlled gondolas shield passengers from the elements, while offering vistas from 175-foot tall Ferris-wheel.

LeRoy Johns, of Sisters, Oregon, loads his net on the Pacific Rose at Fisherman's Terminal in Seattle, Washington. The vessel was preparing for Alaska to fish herring. Compared to many West Coast ports, Johns said Seattle’s maritime industry feels robust and alive. "All the ports I've been to, Seattle is the best port to do boat work and gear work. From California to Alaska, no one comes close to it."

LeRoy Johns, of Sisters, Oregon, loads his net on the Pacific Rose at Fisherman’s Terminal in Seattle, Washington. The vessel was preparing for Alaska to fish herring. Compared to many West Coast ports, Johns said Seattle’s maritime industry feels robust and alive. “All the ports I’ve been to, Seattle is the best port to do boat work and gear work. From California to Alaska, no one comes close to it.”

A gaggle of black umbrellas crosses the intersection at 3rd Avenue and Pine Street in downtown Seattle.

A gaggle of black umbrellas crosses the intersection at 3rd Avenue and Pine Street in downtown Seattle.

Janice Thomas and her son Jaden Williams, 13, both in white, worship before their baptism at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2013. Once a month, Pastor Calvin B. May hosts a special baptism service, where he lectures about one of the two main teachings of the church.  The basement pool, which is around 40 years old, is unheated. "Even though it is an outward ceremony, it is an awesome inward spiritual experience,‚" said May. Ulavor Lewis, president of the Deaconess Ministry, is behind with arms outstretched.

Janice Thomas and her son Jaden Williams, 13, both in white, worship before their baptism at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2013. Once a month, Pastor Calvin B. May hosts a special baptism service, where he lectures about one of the two main teachings of the church. The basement pool, which is around 40 years old, is unheated. “Even though it is an outward ceremony, it is an awesome inward spiritual experience,‚” said May. Ulavor Lewis, president of the Deaconess Ministry, is behind with arms outstretched.

Torrance Davis is photographed outside of the Beacon Hill Baptist Church, a turquoise building designated as a Seattle landmark by the Seattle City Council. The church recently replaced the roof, and is working towards updating the siding, windows and to repainting the facility. About 60 to 70 people regularly attend Sunday services. However, Easter draws a larger crowd.

Torrance Davis is photographed outside of the Beacon Hill Baptist Church, a turquoise building designated as a Seattle landmark by the Seattle City Council. The church recently replaced the roof, and is working towards updating the siding, windows and to repainting the facility. About 60 to 70 people regularly attend Sunday services. However, Easter draws a larger crowd.

Mother Clara Houston shakes hands during upstairs services at the Beacon Hill Baptist Church after the baptisms in October. More than 40 years ago, Houston's husband Dr. Robert Houston founded the church.

Mother Clara Houston shakes hands during upstairs services at the Beacon Hill Baptist Church after the baptisms in October. More than 40 years ago, Houston’s husband Dr. Robert Houston founded the church.

Deacons Dwayne McCraney and Fredrick Green sing during an early morning baptism service at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2013.

Deacons Dwayne McCraney and Fredrick Green sing during an early morning baptism service at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2013.

Rev. David McFerrin, left, and Pastor Calvin B. May, right, baptize Janice Thomas, center, during early morning services at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014. On the third Sunday of the month, the church hosts a special service around their basement pool where individuals who accept Christ in their Life are baptized. Those who are baptized are fully submerged under the water to symbolize the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Thomas said she wanted to forge a new direction for herself and her 13-year-old son, who was also baptized. "I wanted to be closer to god and I know a good way to start is to cleanse your body with the baptism," she said. "Jesus got our back now."

Rev. David McFerrin, left, and Pastor Calvin B. May, right, baptize Janice Thomas, center, during early morning services at Beacon Hill Baptist Church Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014. On the third Sunday of the month, the church hosts a special service around their basement pool where individuals who accept Christ in their Life are baptized. Those who are baptized are fully submerged under the water to symbolize the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Thomas said she wanted to forge a new direction for herself and her 13-year-old son, who was also baptized. “I wanted to be closer to god and I know a good way to start is to cleanse your body with the baptism,” she said. “Jesus got our back now.”

Mother Thian Mawy, 19, tends to her baby Peter, 10 months, at their Tukwila, Washington apartment. The family, from Burma, sometimes struggles with transportation to medical appointments. Even bus passes can be difficult to afford. For many families who are low income, transportation is a barrier to accessing health care, particularly during the winter months. Maps of how people die in Seattle and King County tell a stark story of inequity. Life expectancy varies by as much as 12 years. In the Tukwila/SeaTac area, the teen-pregnancy rate is almost three times as high; people are 1½ times more likely to die of diabetes-related causes; and 17 percent of kindergartners in Tukwila are homeless.

Mother Thian Mawy, 19, tends to her baby Peter, 10 months, at their Tukwila, Washington apartment. The family, from Burma, sometimes struggles with transportation to medical appointments. Even bus passes can be difficult to afford. For many families who are low income, transportation is a barrier to accessing health care, particularly during the winter months. Maps of how people die in Seattle and King County tell a stark story of inequity. Life expectancy varies by as much as 12 years. In the Tukwila/SeaTac area, the teen-pregnancy rate is almost three times as high; people are 1½ times more likely to die of diabetes-related causes; and 17 percent of kindergartners in Tukwila are homeless.

Children play outside of an apartment complex in Tukwila.  Global to Local is working to improve the health of communities in South King County— particularly on chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

Children play outside of an apartment complex in Tukwila. Global to Local is working to improve the health of communities in South King County— particularly on chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

Tony Tansey snuggles with his 3-year-old daughter, Kylie, on the basement floor of Tukwila’s Riverton Park United Methodist Church. The single dad, a cabinetmaker, has lived at the church for about a year, trying to get ahead on bills. Homelessness, as well as lack of access to good food and health services, are some of the challenges facing low-income families in Tukwila, says the Rev. Jan Bolerjack, pastor at Riverton Park.

Tony Tansey snuggles with his 3-year-old daughter, Kylie, on the basement floor of Tukwila’s Riverton Park United Methodist Church. The single dad, a cabinetmaker, has lived at the church for about a year, trying to get ahead on bills. Homelessness, as well as lack of access to good food and health services, are some of the challenges facing low-income families in Tukwila, says the Rev. Jan Bolerjack, pastor at Riverton Park.

Rita Rai, closest to camera, her cousin Som Rai and cousin Albina Rai walk through Tukwila, Washington to a relative's home.  Rai’s family fled persecution in Bhutan, and say they are grateful for the chance to make a new life in the Seattle suburb, where many others are also refugees.  But it’s not been altogether easy here. Her father, Suk, started having seizures a few months ago and, without a car, it took them two bus rides to get him to an emergency room. Doctors discovered he has a rare form of diabetes. He hasn’t been able to work since.  “I do not know what happened to my health,” Suk says. But he wonders if part of it is the food, with its high fat, sodium and sugar. Rita wonders, too, noting that she’s put on 15 pounds since coming to America.

Rita Rai, closest to camera, her cousin Som Rai and cousin Albina Rai walk through Tukwila, Washington to a relative’s home. Rai’s family fled persecution in Bhutan, and say they are grateful for the chance to make a new life in the Seattle suburb, where many others are also refugees.
But it’s not been altogether easy here. Her father, Suk, started having seizures a few months ago and, without a car, it took them two bus rides to get him to an emergency room. Doctors discovered he has a rare form of diabetes. He hasn’t been able to work since.
“I do not know what happened to my health,” Suk says. But he wonders if part of it is the food, with its high fat, sodium and sugar. Rita wonders, too, noting that she’s put on 15 pounds since coming to America.

A large crew of nurses and doctors amass in an attempt to save Seattle Pacific University shooting victim Paul Lee June 5, 2014 at Harborview Emergency Department in Seattle, Washington. Dan Ursino, a registered nurse for 22 years, is performing CPR. "In this situation, our job is to do the best we can," Ursino says. "I did everything I could to help. In my opinion, for some reason, it was his time and God said, 'I am ready for you.' " Lee's family, from Oregon, said they were extremely grateful for the efforts of Harborview staff.  Lee, a 19-year-old freshman, was the only one of three gunshot victims from the shooting to lose his life. He wanted to go into psychology and work with people who had mental disorders, make a difference.  In the aftermath of the shooting, at the hands of 26-year-old Aaron Ybarra of Mountlake Terrace, who struggled with his own psychological problems, the family set up the Paul Lee Foundation to raise money for programs that focus on mental health.

A large crew of nurses and doctors amass in an attempt to save Seattle Pacific University shooting victim Paul Lee June 5, 2014 at Harborview Emergency Department in Seattle, Washington. Dan Ursino, a registered nurse for 22 years, is performing CPR. “In this situation, our job is to do the best we can,” Ursino says. “I did everything I could to help. In my opinion, for some reason, it was his time and God said, ‘I am ready for you.’ ” Lee’s family, from Oregon, said they were extremely grateful for the efforts of Harborview staff.
Lee, a 19-year-old freshman, was the only one of three gunshot victims from the shooting to lose his life. He wanted to go into psychology and work with people who had mental disorders, make a difference.
In the aftermath of the shooting, at the hands of 26-year-old Aaron Ybarra of Mountlake Terrace, who struggled with his own psychological problems, the family set up the Paul Lee Foundation to raise money for programs that focus on mental health.

Inside Harborview: An elite emergency team fights to mend broken bodies and minds, from ace reporter Tyrone Beason.

RN Dan Ursino CQ lays a comforting hand on Vivian deBros CQ after she was injured climbing Mount Stuart. “When patients come into the emergency room, they are frightened, hurt, upset and sometimes all it takes is just put their hand on their shoulder and say I am here for you,” he said.

RN Dan Ursino CQ lays a comforting hand on Vivian deBros CQ after she was injured climbing Mount Stuart. “When patients come into the emergency room, they are frightened, hurt, upset and sometimes all it takes is just put their hand on their shoulder and say I am here for you,” he said.

Julia Chavez-Boswell buries her head in her boyfriend Chad Hahn’s chest as Harborview medical staff examine a fishhook in her son four-year-old son’s Ryker Boswell’s eye. “He’s my only child, you just feel helpless,” Chavez said. “There is nothing you can do. Your child is frightened. You are trying to be strong for the other person without letting them know how frightened you are. It’s a helpless feeling. Your biggest prayer is that the doctor is able to correct what happened.” Chavez said Harborview surgeons and doctors did a great job with the procedure, and appreciated their sensitive bedside manner. “You don’t get loving care like that very often,” she said. “It was beautiful balance of care and medical practice.”

Julia Chavez-Boswell buries her head in her boyfriend Chad Hahn’s chest as Harborview medical staff examine a fishhook in her son four-year-old son’s Ryker Boswell’s eye. “He’s my only child, you just feel helpless,” Chavez said. “There is nothing you can do. Your child is frightened. You are trying to be strong for the other person without letting them know how frightened you are. It’s a helpless feeling. Your biggest prayer is that the doctor is able to correct what happened.” Chavez said Harborview surgeons and doctors did a great job with the procedure, and appreciated their sensitive bedside manner. “You don’t get loving care like that very often,” she said. “It was beautiful balance of care and medical practice.”

RN Dan Ursino puts ointment on Gerardo Ponce De Leon Ayala’s road rash in the Harborview Emergency Department. Ayala attempted to stop his car from rolling down a Capitol Hill street and was drug by the vehicle. “I was very scared,” he said. “I’m glad nothing happened worse.”

RN Dan Ursino puts ointment on Gerardo Ponce De Leon Ayala’s road rash in the Harborview Emergency Department. Ayala attempted to stop his car from rolling down a Capitol Hill street and was drug by the vehicle. “I was very scared,” he said. “I’m glad nothing happened worse.”

Harborview staff tries to save the life of a man who fell in downtown Seattle. Tony Parker, medical assistant, second from right, gives CPR. Parker said he’s learned to develop a mindset that once he is in the emergency department, he is there to focus on his job. “Becoming emotional or involved doesn’t make the situation better,” he said. Parker said some of the best parts of being a medical assistant is working with the community and helping others.

Harborview staff tries to save the life of a man who fell in downtown Seattle. Tony Parker, medical assistant, second from right, gives CPR. Parker said he’s learned to develop a mindset that once he is in the emergency department, he is there to focus on his job. “Becoming emotional or involved doesn’t make the situation better,” he said. Parker said some of the best parts of being a medical assistant is working with the community and helping others.

Vovinam Viet Vo Dao martial arts group circle fireworks during First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch. The Ksitigarbha Temple, home to two Buddhist shrines, is only open during special ceremonies throughout the year. For more information, visit: http://diatangtemple.org.

Vovinam Viet Vo Dao martial arts group circle fireworks during First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch. The Ksitigarbha Temple, home to two Buddhist shrines, is only open during special ceremonies throughout the year. For more information, visit: http://diatangtemple.org.

Crowds watch dragon and lion dancers during the First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch.

Crowds watch dragon and lion dancers during the First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch.

A Buddhist monk watches the fireworks during First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch. The Ksitigarbha Temple, home to two Buddhist shrines, is only open during special ceremonies throughout the year.

A Buddhist monk watches the fireworks during First Full Moon Ceremony of the Lunar New Year at the Ksitigarbha Temple in Lynnwood, Wash. Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014. More than 1,000 people visited the Chinese and Vietnamese Buddhist Association for lion and dragon dancer performances, firecrackers, offering and prayers, as well as a free vegetarian lunch. The Ksitigarbha Temple, home to two Buddhist shrines, is only open during special ceremonies throughout the year.

Adisa Dzamalija, from left, Edina Kunduklija, Amina Becic and Anela Becic talk after singing at the commemoration of the Bosnian genocide Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline.

Adisa Dzamalija, from left, Edina Kunduklija, Amina Becic and Anela Becic talk after singing at the commemoration of the Bosnian genocide Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline.

More than 200 people gathered for a Bosnian genocide commemoration ceremony Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline. The non-profit Voices of the Bosnian Genocide, comprised mostly of young people, organized the event

More than 200 people gathered for a Bosnian genocide commemoration ceremony Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline. The non-profit Voices of the Bosnian Genocide, comprised mostly of young people, organized the event

Meho Mestrovac, center, tears up during a commemoration of the Bosnian genocide. About 200 people gathered for the interfaith program aimed to honor the victims, share local families' stories and unite the Bosnian community and their neighbors in hope of preventing future genocides. Many local Bosnians lost family members during the July 1995 massacres, where Serbian forces executed more than 8,000 Muslim boys and men. Some of those families are still waiting for their loved ones remains to be found. During the Bosnian War, Mestrovac lost around 20 members of his family, and spent 10 months in a concentration camp. "It's not often we get to tell our story," said Irfan Mirza, with the non-profit Voices of the Bosnian Genocide, who organized the program. "These stories help us form the collective memory of this community, we are part of mosaic of American fabric and we don't speak out, then we become underlayment." (The cloth under the quilt.) Representatives from the Jewish and Christian community also attended the event, and shared the iftar, the evening meal when Muslims break fasting during Ramadan.

Meho Mestrovac, center, tears up during a commemoration of the Bosnian genocide. About 200 people gathered for the interfaith program aimed to honor the victims, share local families’ stories and unite the Bosnian community and their neighbors in hope of preventing future genocides. Many local Bosnians lost family members during the July 1995 massacres, where Serbian forces executed more than 8,000 Muslim boys and men. Some of those families are still waiting for their loved ones remains to be found. During the Bosnian War, Mestrovac lost around 20 members of his family, and spent 10 months in a concentration camp. “It’s not often we get to tell our story,” said Irfan Mirza, with the non-profit Voices of the Bosnian Genocide, who organized the program. “These stories help us form the collective memory of this community, we are part of mosaic of American fabric and we don’t speak out, then we become underlayment.” (The cloth under the quilt.) Representatives from the Jewish and Christian community also attended the event, and shared the iftar, the evening meal when Muslims break fasting during Ramadan.

Medina Mehmedovic, center, 17, of Renton, prays on Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline. Around 200 people gathered for a commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Bosnian genocide, alongside prayer services. Mehmedovic said her grandfather and uncle lived through two years in concentration camps during the Bosnian War. "I feel like it is important for people to remember because it should never happen again to any country," she said. "It's very painful thinking of all the murders that happened." Her cousin Fatima Mehmedovic, 17, is at right.

Medina Mehmedovic, center, 17, of Renton, prays on Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the Islamic Community of Bosniaks in Washington in Shoreline. Around 200 people gathered for a commemoration of the 19th anniversary of the Bosnian genocide, alongside prayer services. Mehmedovic said her grandfather and uncle lived through two years in concentration camps during the Bosnian War. “I feel like it is important for people to remember because it should never happen again to any country,” she said. “It’s very painful thinking of all the murders that happened.” Her cousin Fatima Mehmedovic, 17, is at right.

Spring sunlight streams through the windows at Kerry Hall, as dancers audition at Cornish College of the Arts Sunday, March 23, 2014.

Spring sunlight streams through the windows at Kerry Hall, as dancers audition at Cornish College of the Arts Sunday, March 23, 2014.

In 2014, American author Tom Robbins published his memoir, “Tibetan Peach Pie.” He is photographed in his La Conner, Washington home, which he says is the oldest house in the Skagit Valley city. The author, known to be hyperimaginative, funny and philosophical, calls his home the Villa de Jungle Girl (aka The House of Thrills). Like his books, his abode is filled with color, art, freaks and geeks.

In 2014, American author Tom Robbins published his memoir, “Tibetan Peach Pie.” He is photographed in his La Conner, Washington home, which he says is the oldest house in the Skagit Valley city. The author, known to be hyperimaginative, funny and philosophical, calls his home the Villa de Jungle Girl (aka The House of Thrills). Like his books, his abode is filled with color, art, freaks and geeks.

Motorcyclists participate in a basic rider course outside of South Seattle Community College. The class, put on by the Evergreen Safety Council, is designed for novice rider. The Evergreen Safety Council provides the helmets and bikes, and holds the class every week in numerous locations around the region, said instructor Jeffrey Jung.

Motorcyclists participate in a basic rider course outside of South Seattle Community College. The class, put on by the Evergreen Safety Council, is designed for novice rider. The Evergreen Safety Council provides the helmets and bikes, and holds the class every week in numerous locations around the region, said instructor Jeffrey Jung.

Eugenie Morton, from left in peach shirt, Monica Wilson, hoodie below, Alexandra Gomez, grey hoodie, Jamie Vanderwall, in tank top, Maria Gomez, blue hoodie and Emily Porter, in purple, work on their hair before performing excerpts from The Nutcracker Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014 at the Stroum Jewish Community Center on Mercer Island. The Children's Dance Conservatory, the official school for Island Youth Ballet, sold more than 1,000 tickets for their six shows in December.

Eugenie Morton, from left in peach shirt, Monica Wilson, hoodie below, Alexandra Gomez, grey hoodie, Jamie Vanderwall, in tank top, Maria Gomez, blue hoodie and Emily Porter, in purple, work on their hair before performing excerpts from The Nutcracker Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014 at the Stroum Jewish Community Center on Mercer Island. The Children’s Dance Conservatory, the official school for Island Youth Ballet, sold more than 1,000 tickets for their six shows in December.

Jeremy Reding, an  'Urbanaut' with Seattle Design Nerds, walks inside of their inflatable installation 'CREA.T.UR.E.' in Seattle's Nord Alley CQ Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014. The fourth annual Seattle Design Festival kicked off Friday, Sept. 5 and will be featuring a variety of workshops, talks, films, and gatherings until Friday, Sept. 19. Nine interactive installations were displayed during the weekend block party in Pioneer Square. The installations were designed by troupes of local designers, contractors and community groups and explored the theme "Design in Motion."  The Seattle Design Nerds focuses on creating temporary, interactive installations in our city's underutilized places. For more information on the group and festival, visit:  http://seattledesignnerds.org/ and http://designinpublic.org.

Jeremy Reding, an ‘Urbanaut’ with Seattle Design Nerds, walks inside of their inflatable installation ‘CREA.T.UR.E.’ in Seattle’s Nord Alley CQ Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014. The fourth annual Seattle Design Festival kicked off Friday, Sept. 5 and will be featuring a variety of workshops, talks, films, and gatherings until Friday, Sept. 19. Nine interactive installations were displayed during the weekend block party in Pioneer Square. The installations were designed by troupes of local designers, contractors and community groups and explored the theme “Design in Motion.” The Seattle Design Nerds focuses on creating temporary, interactive installations in our city’s underutilized places. For more information on the group and festival, visit: http://seattledesignnerds.org/ and http://designinpublic.org.

A man driving a convertible reacts as Seattle Police surround his vehicle while a crowd of protesters, many in masks, travel down 6th Avenue in downtown Seattle Thursday, May 1, 2014.

A man driving a convertible reacts as Seattle Police surround his vehicle while a crowd of protesters, many in masks, travel down 6th Avenue in downtown Seattle Thursday, May 1, 2014.

Flor Barahona, center, prays at La Luz del Mundo church in Seattle’s Rainier Valley. Barahona, a housekeeper, is the sole breadwinner for her parents, younger siblings and two teenage daughters in El Salvador. “If I don't send money they don't eat,” she says. “I have lived a long nine years. It's been difficult. God gives me strength to go on.” But neighborhoods like this one and others that dot the Seattle area feed into a fast-growing, half-trillion-dollar, international money-transfer industry known as remittances. That’s the term used when immigrants and foreign migrant workers in wealthy nations send money to their poorer home countries to help support loved ones they’ve left behind. Behind the dramatic headlines, behind the modest local storefronts and behind every $100 wired halfway around the world are everyday stories of struggle, survival, yearning and connection.

Flor Barahona, center, prays at La Luz del Mundo church in Seattle’s Rainier Valley. Barahona, a housekeeper, is the sole breadwinner for her parents, younger siblings and two teenage daughters in El Salvador. “If I don’t send money they don’t eat,” she says. “I have lived a long nine years. It’s been difficult. God gives me strength to go on.” But neighborhoods like this one and others that dot the Seattle area feed into a fast-growing, half-trillion-dollar, international money-transfer industry known as remittances. That’s the term used when immigrants and foreign migrant workers in wealthy nations send money to their poorer home countries to help support loved ones they’ve left behind. Behind the dramatic headlines, behind the modest local storefronts and behind every $100 wired halfway around the world are everyday stories of struggle, survival, yearning and connection.

Zach Rowe, of Seattle's Chaotic Noise Marching Corps, dances to What Cheer? Brigade brass band during the last day of HONK! Fest West! at Waterfront Park in Seattle Sunday, June 22, 2014. The free, three-day festival ended Sunday celebrating community street band culture. Bands from around the country performed in public places around the Seattle including Georgetown and Fremont. What Cheer? Brigade brass band is based out of Providence, Rhode Island.

Zach Rowe, of Seattle’s Chaotic Noise Marching Corps, dances to What Cheer? Brigade brass band during the last day of HONK! Fest West! at Waterfront Park in Seattle Sunday, June 22, 2014. The free, three-day festival ended Sunday celebrating community street band culture. Bands from around the country performed in public places around the Seattle including Georgetown and Fremont. What Cheer? Brigade brass band is based out of Providence, Rhode Island.

Catherine Arnold walks through the Seattle Chinese Garden's Seattle-Luoyang Peony Festival Sunday, May 4, 2014. The two-day festival brought hundreds of people to see the garden's 400 peony plants, which were planted in the display garden over the last year. The plants were given as a gift from Luoyang, China, which is well known for their peonies within the country. Bob Seely, garden manager, said the plant symbolizes wealth and abundance. "It's a very loved and auspicious flower in China," said Seely.

Catherine Arnold walks through the Seattle Chinese Garden’s Seattle-Luoyang Peony Festival Sunday, May 4, 2014. The two-day festival brought hundreds of people to see the garden’s 400 peony plants, which were planted in the display garden over the last year. The plants were given as a gift from Luoyang, China, which is well known for their peonies within the country. Bob Seely, garden manager, said the plant symbolizes wealth and abundance. “It’s a very loved and auspicious flower in China,” said Seely.

Christy Mariko prepares to walk on stage during the Bunka Gakuen University fashion show. The students, who attend school in Tokyo, completely produce their own show with sound, lighting, music as well as hair and makeup.

Christy Mariko prepares to walk on stage during the Bunka Gakuen University fashion show. The students, who attend school in Tokyo, completely produce their own show with sound, lighting, music as well as hair and makeup.