Outgoing John Moffitt, right, and introverted James Carpenter couldn’t be more different, but the Seahawks hope they’ll pair up to give stability and durability for years to come.

To read Seattle Times staff reporter Danny O’Neil’s story: http://bit.ly/pWNuFB

All images copyright Erika Schultz/The Seattle Times


Horses graze on warm evening near the Wind River, Fremont County.


Aspen in Sinks Canyon, near Lander.


A portrait of Halee, one of my oldest friends, is taken in her parents’ barn outside of Riverton, Wyoming. I think we’ve been friends since the age of four or five. Her parents and sister Kinsey hold a tender place in my heart, and their farm was amazing place to visit while growing up. Their farmhouse is surrounded by old cottonwood trees and a small, sweet creek. There are horses. Tree swings. Her parents work in their respective spaces — Ray in the carpentry shop and Wendy in her pottery cabin. A wood burning stove kept us warm while watching movies. The girls lived in the attic. Firecracker wars occurred spontaneously. The black railroad bridge still crosses over the Wind River just down the road.


Turkey feathers in the garage.


Old Blue on Highway 135 near Sand Draw.


Weathered photos, Wind River Heritage Center.


Jake Korell, 97, actively traps beaver, coyotes and other animals around Fremont County. Throughout the years, I’ve gone with trapping with Jake, visited his taxidermy shop and listened his stories and harmonica.


Aspens on Togwotee Pass (pronounced toe-go-tee), Wyoming.


Sandstone formations, Gas Hills.


Jackalope gas station exhibit, Dubois, Wyoming; Paintings of Jake “Trapper” Korrell; Wyoming flag.


Willows turn golden in riparian areas on Togwotee Pass, where you can sometimes find moose, elk and cutthroat trout.


A portrait of Halee is take with the cottonwood trees at her parent’s farm.


Evening clouds and irrigation canals in Fremont County, Wyoming.


A portrait of Kinsey is taken near her parent’s barn outside of Riverton, Wyoming.


Morning hits the badlands outside of Dubois, Wyoming. Butch Cassidy, Walt Disney, lawyer Gerry Spence lived here. But long before, it was the ancestral home of the Shoshone Sheepeaters tribe.


Little cousin Kristen, center, performs with the dance team at Riverton High School’s new stadium.


Kristen, fourth from left, stretches with the dance team at Riverton High School. Little cousin is smart, honest and self possessed. And, pretty dang sassy, too.


Members of the Riverton High School dance team stretch before performing at the football game.


Grand Teton National Park, Jenny Lake, Wyoming.


Dad shines a flashlight while we finish cleaning my doe deer in Fremont County. I’m pretty sure I’m the only one in the office who eats deer curry for lunch.


Togwotee Pass, located on the continental divide in the Absaroka Mountains, separate the Wind River valley from the Jackson Hole.


Dad drives Old Blue back home after deer hunting.


Clouds pass over Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming.


Chad Norris lights a candle for Espresso Vivace’s longtime barista and manager Brian Fairbrother Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011 in South Lake Union. Norris described Fairbrother as luminous, bright, curious and very supportive.

(All images copyright Erika Schultz/The Seattle Times)


Written tributes to Espresso Vivace’s longtime barista and manager Brian Fairbrother were noted outside their Alley 24 store. “We have today’s staff and yesterday’s staff and staff from 15 years ago here,” said Geneva Sullivan, one of the founders of Espresso Vivace. “He was so much a part of the culture of Vivace.”


Linda Clecker, left, hugs Brian Racy next to the white memorial bicycle honoring longtime barista and manager at Espresso Vivace Brian Fairbrother. Fairbrother was general manager over all three of Vivace’s locations and directly oversaw its Alley 24 shop. Racy said Fairbrother was one of the deepest most loving people he knew.


A large crowd participates in a memorial march for Espresso Vivace’s longtime barista and manager Brian Fairbrother Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011 in South Lake Union. “He was a community icon and a big bright light in community, who touched thousands and thousands of people in Seattle and beyond,” said Lisa Halpern. “Lots of people knew him as the unofficial mayor of Seattle.”


Chalk tributes were written and drawn for Espresso Vivace’s longtime barista and manager Brian Fairbrother Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011 in South Lake Union.


Linda Cleckler, from left, and Cherilynn Brooks, both longtime Espresso Vivace employees, embrace Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011 outside of the Alley 24 store. A large group of friends, loved ones and Vivace customers and employees gathered for a memorial march that began at the store.

Geneva Sullivan, one of the founders of Espresso Vivace, and Brian K. Wells share in a laugh during a memorial walk for Vivace’s longtime barista and manager Brian Fairbrother Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011 in South Lake Union. “We have today’s staff and yesterday’s staff and staff from 15 years ago here,” said Sullivan. “He was so much a part of the culture of Vivace.” “For me personally, he was just a very, very good friend.”


As the sun sets, workers harvest hops in Yakima Valley, Washington— the largest producer of hopes in the United States, with about 80 percent of the crop. The hop harvest began the last week of August and will continue until the end of September. Growers expect to yield and average crop, and that some growers have been shifting to special flavor varieties that are favored by the craft brewing industry.

(All images copyright Erika Schultz/The Seattle Times)

Click here to read Brian Cantwell’s Sunday travel article, “Wine and Dine in Yakima Valley”


Cherry bomb chili peppers, Crawford Vineyard grapes, eggplant from Buggirl’s garden


Efrain Palencia, a longtime employee, drops clusters of viognier grapes at Crawford Vineyard to lessen to load to help with the ripening process. Crawford Vineyard, located about four miles outside of Prosser, Wash., supplies cabernet sauvignon, pinot grigio, lemberger and merlot grapes to Thurston Wolfe Winery in Vintner’s Village.


Johnson Orchards, in Yakima, sell freshly made pies on Fridays and Saturdays out of their bakeshop.